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NHTSA Finds Nearly Half of All Drivers Believe Speeding is a Problem on U.S. Roads 

1 in 5 drivers admit "I try to get where I am going as fast as I can"

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) today released a newNational Survey of Speeding Attitudes and Behavior in which nearly half of drivers surveyed say speeding is a problem on our nation's roads, and one in five drivers surveyed admitted, "I try to get where I am going as fast as I can." Speeding-related deaths nationwide account for nearly a third of all traffic fatalities each year, taking close to 10,000 lives.

"We all have places we need to go, but it's never the right decision to put ourselves, our families and others in harm's way to get there faster," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. "This is another reminder, as the busy holiday season approaches, to obey speed limits, reduce speed in inclement weather conditions and allow plenty of time to arrive safely."

NHTSA's latest National Survey of Speeding Attitudes and Behavior provides national estimates of behavior and attitudes toward speeding in the United States. Survey results show a broad range of perspectives among drivers. The majority of drivers, about four out of five, believed driving at or near the speed limit makes it easier to avoid dangerous situations and reduces the chances of a crash. An overwhelming majority, 91 percent, agreed with the statement that "everyone should obey the speed limits because it's the law." Almost half of all drivers, 48 percent, said that it was very important that something be done to reduce speeding on U.S. roads.

However, despite acknowledging the safety benefits of speed limits and reasons drivers should follow them, more than a quarter of those surveyed admitted "speeding is something I do without thinking" and "I enjoy the feeling of driving fast." Further, sixteen percent felt that "driving over the speed limit is not dangerous for skilled drivers."

"The need for speed should never trump the need for safe and responsible driving," said NHTSA Administrator David Strickland. "Motorists who drive at excessive speeds put themselves and others at an increased risk of being involved in a crash and possibly of being injured or killed."

Of those surveyed, male drivers admitted to speeding more compared to females based on responses to behavior questions. Also, drivers with the least experience behind the wheel, 16-20 years old, admitted to speeding more frequently than any other age group. More than one in ten, 11 percent, of drivers age 16 to 20 reported at least one speeding-related crash in the past five years, compared to 4 percent for the population as a whole. The percentage of drivers in speeding-related crashes in this age group is greater than in any other age group, even though these young drivers may not have been driving for all of the past five years.

To encourage safe driving practices among teens, NHTSA recently launched its "5 to Drive" campaign that challenges parents to discuss five critical driving practices with their teenage drivers that can have the greatest beneficial impacts in the event of a crash: No speeding, no cell phone use or texting while driving; no extra passengers; no alcohol, and; no driving or riding without a seat belt.

NHTSA works closely with state officials on all aspects of traffic safety including speed management. The agency provides resources and guidance for establishing speeding policies, enforcing laws and increasing public awareness of the risks of excessive speed.

Stopping Distance

A key issue in speeding related crashes is the fact that most motorists underestimate the distance needed to stop.

When traveling at 65 mph, your vehicle is moving at 95 feet per second.

With reaction time and stopping distance, it will take your vehicle over 100 yards to come to a complete stop.


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The Problem

One of the disturbing problems with speeding is that while most people accept that speeding increases crash risk, most people continue to speed. While drunk driving is generally viewed as socially unacceptable, speeding is not.

Research has shown that people make false distinctions about categories of speeding.

Many people define speeding by 5-10 mph as merely 'driving over the limit' and even view speeding by 10-20 mph as

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GHSA Report on Speeding


GHSA conducted an online survey of its State Highway Safety Office (SHSO) members to take the pulse of current state efforts to control the problems of speeding and aggressive driving. All fifty states and Guam responded.

This report outlines the states' responses. It covers a number of key topics, including: the public perception of the issue; the conflicted role of technology; and the existing appetite for change.

The report also provides recommendations to states and the federal government to address the tremendous losses associated with speeding-related crashes.

Download the complete report below. 

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